You Can Make Excuses or You Can Make Changes

Friday, July 3rd, 2015

I can make excuses about anything. Seriously, I am such a pro at it that I can rationalize almost anything. Why can’t I lose weight? Because I don’t have the energy, or I have no self-control. Why am I not going to the gym? Well, you see, I have this herniated disc that prevents me from doing any exercise that involves my back, which is almost all of them, so really I am doing good by not going to the gym, right? Wrong.

The reality is that all of my rationalizations are nothing more than what I like to call, “verbal diarrhea”.  They aren’t reasons, they are excuses. They are my way of saying that I am not willing to do what it takes to get closer to my goal. They are also my way of staying right where I am and not progressing any further.

That is why every time I notice myself making an excuse or rationalizing behavior that isn’t going to take me where I want to be, I need to ask myself how bad I want it. Really and truly, if I want something, I will do whatever it takes to get it. So, if I’m not willing to do what it takes, it may be simply that I don’t want it bad enough.

Kids are great at this concept, by the way. For example, if you tell your children to clean their room, they likely won’t do it (or at least they won’t do it well) because they don’t see the benefit to it. They don’t really want it.

On the same token, if you were to say, “Hey there Johnny and Sally, if you clean your room today then I am going to take you to Disney next week,” you better get out of their way because that room will be spotless in no time. They will be asking for all purpose cleaner and the vacuum, two things you didn’t even realize they knew existed, because they want to show you that they really, really, really want to see Mickey, Minnie, and all of the other Disney characters. They want it, so they do it.

So, if you don’t feel that sort of level of commitment or passion toward whatever it is that you keep making excuses about, ask yourself how bad you really want it. And if you do want it, why aren’t you doing it? What are you afraid of? What is standing in your way?

Once you have dissected it and figured out why you have been rationalizing or excusing your behaviors (or lack thereof), then you can decide whether you truly want it or not. Maybe you don’t, and if that is the case, that is okay too.

But if you do, maybe it is just for the wrong reasons or perhaps it is that you haven’t given it the time necessary to wrap your head around why it is important to you. Take care of that then and you will finally be able to get past the excuses and start working toward results.

Essentially, you have two options: You can make excuses or you can make changes. Which one do you want to do?


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